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In addition to identifying trends through our daily interactions with companies and job seekers, we conduct extensive research on hiring and employment issues. Read about our latest research, including results from our ongoing surveys of CFOs, CIOs, lawyers, advertising and marketing executives, human resources managers, senior managers and workers.

Survey: 94 Percent Of Managers Would Rehire Former Employees
Workers More Hesitant to Return to Their Previous Companies

MENLO PARK, Calif., Jan. 17, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- The competitive hiring market has companies casting a wide net to find job candidates with the in-demand skills they need. A new Accountemps survey found that more than nine in 10 senior managers (94 percent) are open to rehiring boomerang employees —staff members who previously left the company on good terms.

Rehiring Former Employees

The research, however, also revealed that former employees were not quite as eager for a reunion, with 52 percent of workers likely to apply for a position with a previous company. Reasons professionals cited for not wanting to return to past employers included dissatisfaction with management (22 percent), poor fit with organizational culture (17 percent), unfulfilling job duties (13 percent) and bridges burned by the company (11 percent).

View the Rehiring Former Employees infographic for the survey findings.

"Companies need to leave no stone unturned in their search for talent in today's competitive hiring environment," said Michael Steinitz, executive director of Accountemps. "Boomerang employees are an attractive option because the firm is already familiar with how they'll perform and fit in with the organizational culture. Returning workers also require less training to get up to speed and may have acquired valuable new skills while they were gone.

"Rehiring a former staff member may seem like a simple process, but it's essential to understand why the person originally left and whether the issue has been resolved," advised Steinitz. "The employee will not stay long if past problems keep resurfacing."

Accountemps offers these tips when considering a previous employee's return:

  • Have a conversation. Before launching the formal hiring process with a former employee, check in on what they're looking for from your company and ensure all previous issues have been addressed.
  • Conduct a formal interview. Follow all hiring procedures as you would with a new candidate. Perform reference checks (including the most recent employer) and have an in-depth discussion to ensure that a return would be beneficial for both parties.
  • Reorient the employee. If the person is rehired, have them go through the standard onboarding process to bring them up to speed on current company policies and processes.
  • Reassess skills. Managers should consider the returning employee's updated experience to determine if they may be suited for new roles or responsibilities.

About the Research
The online surveys were developed by Accountemps and conducted by independent research firms. They include responses from more than 1,000 U.S. workers 18 years of age or older and employed in office environments and more than 2,800 senior managers at companies with 20 or more employees.

About Accountemps
Accountemps, a Robert Half company, is the world's first and largest specialized staffing service for temporary accounting, finance and bookkeeping professionals. The staffing firm has more than 300 locations worldwide. More resources, including job search services and the company's blog, can be found at roberthalf.com/accountemps.

 

 

SOURCE Accountemps

For further information: Bianca De Rose, (650) 234-6022, bianca.derose@roberthalf.com, Accountemps, 2884 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025